Do This Today: An Evening with Key & Peele: In Conversation with Patton Oswalt

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Do you like comedy? Tonight Patton Oswalt (so funny) is interviewing Key & Peele to discuss their Peabody award winning sketch comedy show. Expect to see a selection of highlights from the show. It’s going to be a very funny evening.

Event: An Evening with Key & Peele: In Conversation with Patton OSwalt (event link)
Location: The Paley Center for Media, 465 N. Beverly Drive, Beverly Hills, CA
Time: Monday June 9, 2014
Cost: For Memebrs $15, for the public $25 (get tickets HERE!)

BONUS Do This Today: LACMA Conversation with Michael Wilkinson: Superman- Costume Icon

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This is a tad pricy for the blog, but sounds cool. Check out the LACMA tonight to see Michael Wilkinson (who was nominated for an Oscar in Costume Design for American Hustle) in conversation with Bobi Garland. Warner Bros even loaned some of Wilkinson’s costume designs for the event. If you’re into wardrobe and costume design, this event is for you. It’s $35 for LACMA members, $25 for students, and $40 for the public.

Event: LACMA Conversation with Michael Wilkinson: Superman- Costuming an Icon (event link)
Location: LACMA, 5905 Wilshire Blvd, Los Angeles, CA
Time: Tuesday March 4, 2014, 7pm
Cost: $40 for the public, $25 for students, $35 for LACMA members

Weekend Time!

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It’s Weekend time! Are you ready? I had a fabulous Thursday night hitting up Mr. C with my uncle and some good friends. Who knew that was such a scene? I highly recommend it for the people-watching. On to weekend plans- who’s gott’em?

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Tonight, Friday February 21, 2014, The Comedy Bureau’s Jake Kroeger is hosting Night Cap at Goorin Bros. Hat Shop on Melrose in Hollywood. The show costs $5 and starts at 8:30p. Come see Maria Bamford, Margot Leitman, Baron Vaughn, Andy Peters and more!

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On Saturday, February 22, 2014, The Echo is hosting Sock Puppet Sitcom Theater Presents: The Golden Girls! It starts at 8p and tickets are $10. This is going to be awesome.

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If you’re looking for something equally as old school but a little more hip+happenin’, Drink:Eat:Play is throwing an 80’s Prom Party at the Fonda starting at 9pm on Saturday. Tickets are $30.

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Neil Hamburger has a show on Sunday February 23rd at the Satellite, with guests Nick Flanagan, Jason Rouse, Brody Stevens and Eddie Pepitone! Tickets are $8 and you can get them here.

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If hiking is more your thing, what better than to check out Modern Hiker’s beautifully redesigned website, pick a trail and make your Sunday all about nature! And of course stop by Golden Road for a post-hike refreshing beer.

Do This Today: Let’s Get Emotional with Charlyne Yi

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Tonight check out Charlyne Yi’s show “Let’s Get Emotional” at the Steve Allen Theatre (Trepany House). This months guests are Becky Stark, Bobcat Gooldtwait, Jet Elfman, Ann Maddox, Will Donegan and Jem Jay Ignacio on piano.

Event: Let’s Get Emotional with Charlyne Yi (event)
Location: Trepany House, 4773 Hollywood Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90027
Time: Tuesday February 11, 2014, 8 – 10:30pm
Cost: Tickets are $10 and you can get them HERE!

Do This Today: Live Mulaney Taping

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Today’s “Do This Today” is not actually happening today, BUT check out John Mulaney’s live show taping in Los Angeles for FREE! Today head over to THIS website and see which show taping dates work for you. This mulit-camera show stars John Mulaney, Martin Short and Elliot Gould. If you have a free afternoon/evening, why not check it out.

Event: Live Mulaney Show Taping (event link)
Location: CBS Radford, 4024 Radford Ave, Studio City, CA 91604
Time: Wednesday February 5, 4pm – 8:30p
Cost: FREE! Get your free tickets HERE!

Israel XI: Old City Jerusalem During the Day Part 2

To catch you up to speed, check out these earlier posts about my trip:
Israel I: Modern Tel Aviv
Israel II: Jaffa (the Old City)
Israel III: Modern Art and Bauhaus Architecture
Israel IV: Caesarea and Haifa
Israel V: Acre (Akko)
Israel VI: The Sea of Galilee
Israel VII: Golan Heights
Israel VIII: Nazareth
Israel IX: Masada and the Dead Sea
Israel X: Old City Jerusalem at Night
Israel XI: Old City Jerusalem Daytime Part 1

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Here’s the map again, to help you follow along our path. The last post took us with our guide through key Muslim and Jewish sites. This post takes us through Christian/Catholic sites and the celebration of the first night of Hanukah.

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We started this portion of the tour at the Church of St. Anne, which is the birthplace of Mary. It was very calm and peaceful here.

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It has a beautiful church (known for it’s acoustics), gardens that surround it, and even these ruins above of where the church used to stand. Again, there are so many layers to this city.

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Mary was born in the Muslim Quarter, so while on the grounds it was fun catching this shot above. Look at all the men’s brightly colored clothes. I thought it was funny, because the women where dark colored wraps and yet look at all those colors she’s working with.

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This is inside the church. You can see the ceiling curves which helps it get its great acoustic sound. It’s not uncommon to have choirs and singing tour groups stop in to rehearse in this space to enjoy the sound.

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Down in the basement is an area dedicated to Mary’s birthplace. Just like everything here, it claims to be “the site of her birth” but it’s hard to really know after all this time.

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From here we walked the Via Dolorosa, which also begins in the Muslim Quarter. See the map above.

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Walking the walk…

 

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This is supposedly where Jesus touched, and you can see many peoples hands have touched the same place. This is right around station 5.

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Here we are at the last station, the Church of the Holy Sepulchre. All along the walk you can see Catholic groups singing and reading from the bible as they walk. It’s a busy path.

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I touched on this before, but the Church of the Holy Sepulchre is owned by many catholic sects. For example, above is the portion owned by the Ethiopians. They don’t own within the church, but this is a monastery just outside of it. According to Wikipedia, the Holy Sepulchre is owned by the Eastern Orthodox, Armenian Apostolic, and Roman Catholic Churches, with the Greek Orthodox Church having most of the ownership, and the Coptic Orthodox, the Ethiopian Orthodox, and the Syriac Orthodox have lesser responsibilities. There are strict rules about who can pray where within this space. And even who should enter from which entrance. It’s strange.

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Above is the Golgotha Altar. There was a long line to crawl in this space and reach your hand to touch the alter through a small opening. I did not wait in this line, since Im not Catholic.

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Above within the church is the stone that Jesus was supposedly laid on. All day people come and hug/rub it. It’s weird, although clearly means something important to all the people who do this. My guide book said that the “real” stone was damaged in a fire and this stone is a more current replacement stone.

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Our guide took us into a corner room where you can clearly see the damage from the fire. A smaller religious sect owns this room and doesn’t have the money to repair it. If they accept financial help from another religion in the church, then they would have to share ownership. It’s very political, but it was cool to see an untouched part of this church.

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Our guide wanted to show us a view of the Old City from a hillside, so we exited through the Jewish Quarter which gave us a glimpse at the preparations for the first night of Hanukkah.

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After our tour day finished, we relaxed and then decided to head back into the Old City to explore the first night of Hanukkah.

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It was so beautiful seeing all the lanterns outside the homes. Walking through the alleys and walkways lit by candle. I can’t express just how beautiful it was.

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And there are no tacky menorahs here. They were all so pretty and artistic.

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Such fun getting lost in the pathways. At one point we heard singing and gutar playing, and followed it to see a group of teens celebrating with song in an alley all together. I couldn’t take a picture because it was an intimate religious moment to walk into. But lets just say it will all stick with me for life. Such a great night.

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Santa’s were starting to come out too.

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We decided to have dinner in the New City this night at Touro which was a lovely walk down the street from our hotel. The food was excellent and our waitress helped us plan our next days activities and we wined and dined.

Israel XI: Old City Jerusalem Daytime Part 1

To catch you up to speed, check out these earlier posts about my trip:
Israel I: Modern Tel Aviv
Israel II: Jaffa (the Old City)
Israel III: Modern Art and Bauhaus Architecture
Israel IV: Caesarea and Haifa
Israel V: Acre (Akko)
Israel VI: The Sea of Galilee
Israel VII: Golan Heights
Israel VIII: Nazareth
Israel IX: Masada and the Dead Sea
Israel X: Old City Jerusalem at Night
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The last time I left off, I arrived back from my day trip to Masada and the Dead Sea to explore Old City Jerusalem as the sun was setting. After a super fun night of exploration, we were up early the next morning to meet our tour guide for a full day seeing the Old City and learning the history with our guide. My Uncle’s colleague recommended a private tour guide named Reuven Zusman who gives us a full day walking tour throughout the Old City. Giving tours is a very serious business over there, as you can see many guides teaching groups all over Israel. In fact Reuven said there are required classes and hours of study to maintain his status as tour guide. Reuven really knows his history. If you’re taking a trip and want Reuven as a guide, email me at lifeabsorbed@gmail.com and I can give you his info.

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Here’s the map of Old Jerusalem again, as a refresher. And another map showing some of the Old City highlights.

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We began by entering through the Zion Gate along the south wall.

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That’s my uncle in blue, and our guide Reuvan as we started our day by heading to the place that normally has the longest line, Dome of the Rock, to hopefully avoid the long lines.

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On our walk we had a great view of Mount of Olives. This is much easier to see in the daylight, verse my walk last night.

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We walked through the Jewish Quarter to get to the Dome. We had a great day for photos, as the weather was perfect.

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We lucked out and the line to get in was small, so we decided to check that off the list. Security to get onto these grounds is no joke, and it’s also why the lines take so long. They search belongings, make you walk through metal detecters and were a bit fussy if you went to fast through all the steps. They mean business, and with good reason as this is a very important site for Muslims, Jews, and Christians and could easily be a target because of it’s importance.

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It’s such a beautiful building.

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Since we were there early, I was able to take people-less photos.

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After leaving the Dome we walked through the Muslim Quarter and grabbed a fast yummy lunch at Basti Restaurant at our guides suggestion.

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I just love all these paths and walkways. I had so much fun imagining that in BC time this was their version of roads. This was their big city. I could spend weeks getting lost in the sights, smells, and sounds of these walkways.

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I really love it. Most of the photos I brought back from the trip are of these walkways.

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Our guide took us up a public (although it looks semi private) staircase that put us above the markets. The spot where we are standing is above where the four quarters meet.

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It felt like we were in Aladdin, hoping from rooftop to rooftop.

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The photo above has a cat which reminds me, there are cats all over Israel. Everywhere. My photos don’t show it, but we saw probably thousands over the two weeks.

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We made our way back over to the Western Wall (and Temple Mount entrance. We had a nice upper view from the roof.

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Our guide told us about how they were fixing up the ramp to Temple Mount when they uncovered ruins below and are now doing excavation work. This prompted me to ask, “Since all of what’s below us dates back so far, isn’t everything below us worthy of being excavated? I mean it shouldn’t be a shocker that when they dug down 10 feet that hit important ruins, since the city has been rebuilt over it’s self so many times.” Our tour guide brought up a very important point, that Israel has had many different owners in it’s lifetime, and each had a different political and religious agenda. Depending on who’s controlling Israel determines what get’s excavated. For example, why would a government of one religion want to dig up ruins that might prove that a different religion might have more ties the land? Something to think about…

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This is one of the old walls to the city at one point in time (in the Jewish Quarter). The history dates back so far, that I’m sure there have been many outer walls over that time.

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I like this photo above because it shows you the old wall down below, and many layers above it is a modern building. You have to imagine there have been many layers like this over this lands existance. Since America is so new, it’s hard to imagine this city, on city, on city development.

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Here is one of many areas where you can see how the layers of this city are built up.

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We decided to do the tunnel tour, which takes you along the buried part of the Western Wall. This was an interesting tour, yet not what I expected. I must admit it got very tight under there as we walked though the tunnels. My uncle had to duck his head the whole time, and at most times it was only a body width wide. I got pretty frieghtened midway through and then was eager to finish the tour. We did get a full history of the wall and what it would have been like back in BC times. I should note that the photo above was in a big room where the tour started, not in the tunnel itself.

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They are doing lots of excavation work along the wall (it’s of great Jewish significance, and the government is of that religious affiliation).

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Here’s where the ceiling is tall, but see how narrow the walkway is?? Coming from LA where earthquakes are so common, I was fearful and kept thinking “what do I do if it all starts shaking- Im trapped!”

Next up, I’ll share with you the second half of the day with our tour guide where we walk the stations of the cross and then we go back into the City at night to see the celebration of the first night of Hanukkah! What a great time to be in the Old City!

Israel X: Old City Jerusalem at Night

To catch you up to speed, check out these earlier posts about my trip:
Israel I: Modern Tel Aviv
Israel II: Jaffa (the Old City)
Israel III: Modern Art and Bauhaus Architecture
Israel IV: Caesarea and Haifa
Israel V: Acre (Akko)
Israel VI: The Sea of Galilee
Israel VII: Golan Heights
Israel VIII: Nazareth
Israel IX: Masada and the Dead Sea
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After finishing our Masada tour, we were dropped back off in Jerusalem near our hotel around 4:30p just in time to find a good sunset spot. We head to one of many roof decks at the Mamilla. Keep in mind we have been in Jerusalem for almost 24 hours, and yet we still haven’t seen much of Jerusalem.

When we got into town the night before (after dark), we went straight to our hotel which was next to the car rental place. We were running only about 5 minutes behind, but that was enough time that the car rental workers, who were still at work, wouldn’t even look at us. Frustration. We knew we had the 7am Masada tour the next morning (the car rental place opens at 8 or 9) so we talked to the awesome staff at the Manilla hotel. They told us where to park it (the car rental place shares a parking lot with the hotel), we gave them the car keys and they walked over the car keys just as it opened in the morning. This means we weren’t charged an extra day. Thank-goodness for the Mamilla, which is a phrase we said several times on the trip!

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Here are the views from the Mamilla roof. Jerusalem has the Old City and the New City. The Old City is everything within the tall walls you can see above. The New City is everything else. The Old City is mostly zigzagging walkways and shops with homes up above. It’s also the traditional city when you think of Jerusalem. The New City (which is where most nice hotels are) is more like Tel Aviv in its newness.

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At this point I’ve barely seen Jerusalem, and Im so antsy to visit the Old City. From the Mamilla you can see the Jaffa gate entrance to the Old City. The Mamilla is along an outdoor shopping mall (like the Grove) which leads right to the Jaffa entrance (there are only a few entrances into the Old City).

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“A” is the hotel, and the Jaffa gate is located where the Christian and Armenian Quarter meet at the edge of the wall. To give you a sense of scale, the Old City is just under a mile high and a mile wide. It’s all super walkable.

 

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I was so excited to be in Jerusalem- I place I remember seeing as a kid via a church slideshow presentation when a couple people came back from a trip. After watching the sunset, I decide to venture off by myself to the Old City since we had a few hours until our dinner reservation (people eat dinner really late in Israel).

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I wandered into the Old City and headed toward the Armenian Quarter. I wandered with no itinerary, knowing that you can’t get too lost in a mile wide city filled with high walls. Eventually you’ll hit the wall, which you can follow until you hit a gate to exit. I had maps with me, but I didn’t want to head to the landmarks so I put the map away and just wandered.

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This site is right around where the Armenian and Jewish Quarter meet. This is on the Jewish side. There’s no real clear distinction between the quarters. There are main walking routes that run along the borders of the quarters, but there’s no big sign saying, “You’re in the Jewish Quarter”. There are several visual clues that tell you where you are (the clothing and religious markings).

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This photo was taken in the Jewish Quarter looking east. The hillside on the right is Mt. of Olives. On the left is Temple Mount and you can even see the top of the Western Wall.

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I headed down closer with the crowd, passing through security and metal detectors to find myself at the Western Wall. Here I was wandering and then BAM, Im at the Western Wall. It was a fun thing to stumble upon.

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You see above, the wall divides the mens and women’s side. The women’s side is much smaller. Also note that when leaving the wall, you’re not supposed to turn your back to the wall, so people walk backwards to leave the wall. It’s a little bizarre to watch, but so much about Israel so far has been about tradition and rituals, so I’m not too surprised.

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I should talk about something that happens throughout the Old City, especially to Americans. Venders are all over the Old City. It’s like the first level of every building is filled with trinket shops or food vendors and all of the owners sit at the entrance and try to get tourists to come in. I had been warned, and I’m good at ignoring cat-calling and when strangers talk to me. As a tourist you have to have a thick skin, and not engage in it. I often spoke French so that they wouldn’t harass me, although that didn’t really work. The best thing is to ignore it. Since I arrived just after sunset, the shops were beginning to close down.

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I walked through the Muslim Quarter and made my way to the Christian Quarter where I stumbled onto the Church of the Holy Sepulchre. I’ll be back tomorrow in the daylight to see everything, but what a nice exploratory mission.

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This is the Stone of Anointing, where Jesus’ body was prepared for burial. Everyone kisses the rock (although everything I read said this was a replacement rock after a fire in the church). All around Jerusalem are people waiting in line to kiss any rock that Jesus touched. I took it a step further and made-out with all of these sites (totally kidding).

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This is the Aedicule. It’s “owned” by several religions and is said to contain the Holy Sepulchre itself as well as the Angel’s Stone which was covering Jesus tomb. This is all depending on what you believe of course. Funny story, since so many religions feel like they own this church, it’s in sections where each group is responsible for maintaining their part (ex. this wall is Greek Orthadox, this closet is Roman Catholic). And in order to keep it all fair, a Muslim family owns the keys to the church. They open and close it every day. It’s the only way to make it fair for all the religions.

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My favorite part of Jeruslaum is wandering the walkways. At night it’s so quiet when the venders shut their doors. When it’s quiet and peaceful at night, it’s easier to imagine this in Jesus times.. or with Kings riding through these streets. I know that the real streets they were on are 30 feet below under many layers of buildings but its fun to imagine.

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This is just outside the Jaffa gate, just before I headed back to the Mamilla for a bath soak before dinner. You can see the Tower of David lit up.

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After the best bath I’ve ever had, we headed up to the Mamilla rooftop for dinner at their restaurant. This was clearly a special occasion restaurant. Next to us a couple got engaged. To the left of us a rock n’roll couple celebrated a birthday. And then mid meal security came through, and Tony Blair and guests took the table behind us. Tony is just to the left of my uncle in this photo. What a fun meal- it was delicious and a fun night dining with Tony 😉

Next up: We have a personal tour guide take us around Old City Jerusalem. You’ll see some duplicate photos from my night wandering, only now in sunlight.

Do This Today: “For The Record: Baz Luhrmann” Previews Begin

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(Photo by Lewis Payton)

Tonight previews begin at Rockwell: Table & Stage for “For The Record: Baz Luhrmann”. This dinner and show will combine “Romeo + Juliet”, “Strictly Ballroom”, Moulin Rouge”, and “The Great Gatsby” into a visceral experience. And yes, that is Rumor Willis as Juliet. It officially opens August 22 with Thursday through Saturday performances (starting at 8pm) and tickets are between $25-$55, but previews start tonight, so come check it out. 

Event: For The Record: Baz Luhrmann (event link)
Location: 1714 N. Vermont Ave, Los Angeles, CA
Time: Thursday August 15, 8p
Cost: $25 general, up to $55 VIP (buy tickets here)

Do This Today: “Only God Forgives” Soundtrack Signing at Origami Vinyl

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I’m sorry the Do This Today is so delayed! I’ve got some big projects going on over here at Life Absorbed but I don’t mean to leave you hanging. I even have a comedy show to tell you all about. But in the meantime, hit up Origami Vinyl tonight from 7-8pm. Director and writer Nicolas Winding Refn and composer Cliff Martinez will be stopping by to sign the movie “Only God Forgives” soundtrack (Ryan Gosling’s new movie). They both worked on this film as well as Ryan Gosling’s “Drive”. Come say hi!

Event: “Only God Forgives” Soundtrack Signing (link)
Location: Origami Vinyl, 1816 W. Sunset Blvd, Los Angeles, CA
Time: Thursday July 25, 2013, 7-8p