DIY Ikea Bookcase Re-Do

If you remember, a while back I made a vellum backing to a hand-me-down Ikea bookcase that was backless. It was an excellent fast/easy/cheap temporary solution. It wasn’t the worst bookcase ever… but it also didn’t match anything and felt like dorm furniture.

bookcase1

Im not one to just throw away a perfectly good bookcase, so I got creative.

bookcase2

I was inspired by Young House Love’s new book! I got it for Christmas and LOVE it. See the photo above of the white bookcase with the blue/green backing? I want that bookcase… so why not just make it?

bookcase3

Since I had to work with the heavily lacquered birch Ikea bookcase, I researched the best way to sand/prime/paint this surface. So many blogs posted that the Rust-Oleum Painters Touch Ultra Coverage (X2) was the best way to go. I decided to go with the flat white and it was $3 a bottle at Home Depot.

bookcase4

I did a coat of white spray paint over everything. By using this paint (made for plastic) it means no sanding! Woo hoo!

bookcase5

You can see above that the spray paint leaves a texture. Im sure with multiple coats, this would go away, but I had left over white paint from my dining table so I decided to do a top coat of my paint. This also means the bookcase will exactly match my table, instead of being a cold white it’ll be a warm white.

bookcase6

To create the backing, I bought 5 sheets of white foam boards from Michael’s (with a 30% off coupon!). I leaned the foam core against the back of the bookcase and traced the bookcase. This way I know exactly how much to paint.

bookcase7

This was a good part to work on while the bookcase was drying. Above you can see the 4 boards on the right have 1 coat, and the board on the left has 2 coats. What a difference?! Do two coats over all the board. It’s super easy using a small paint roller. The paint I purchased was an 8oz container from Home Depot (flat) for $3.

bookcase8

I decided to do the assembly of the backings inside my house (which meant waiting until everything was fully dried.

bookcase9

I laid the bookcase upside down, traced the bookcase again (very precisely) and then cut the foam boards using a metal ruler and exatco blade.

bookcase10

I used just a standard stapler to staple the foam core to the back of the bookcase. It was so easy and took maybe 15 minutes to do all 5 panels. Keep in mind if anything requires cords on the shelves, youll need to cut a notch. For example, we keep our internet router on the shelf, so I cut a small triangle on that shelf’s backing.

bookcase11

I was so excited while assembling, I had to test out how my stuff would look on it. Love it! Do you like my spice rack/diamond shaped sculpture? Check out that DIY here!

bookcase13

You like? It adds such a pop of color and fun to the room. Before the bookcase disappeared into the corner, and now it’s fun to look at and stands out. This project was SO cheap and just required an afternoon of effort.

Advertisements

DIY: Backing A Bookcase

Remember how I told you about my blank canvas? Well I’ve been adding to the room (on a tight budget, of course) and I wanted to share this cheap, fast do-it-yourself project.

You can see the beautiful plants I wrote about here, in the photo above. And also the Ikea curtains I added (click here to see their online specs). But do you notice that the back of the bookcase (my roommate left for us) is completely naked? Not only does this mean wires show in the back, but it visually looks cheap and bare. I got a little creative and came up with an easy solution.

Step 1: Layout the bookcase and asses the tools needed. I got out my hot glue gun, some tacks, an exacto knife and my roll of handy trace paper.

Step 2: Measure the width of the bookcase, and cut a piece of trace paper slightly larger than that length.

Step 3: Tack the corners in place, as this is just temporary and to hold the paper in place while you hot glue the corners down.

Step 4: Hot glue just under the trace paper in each corner. In case you ever want to take it out, this will make it much cleaner to remove. Once dry, remove all the tacks. Then repeat this all down the bookcase, being mindful that seems line up to where the bookcase horizontals will cover them.

If you followed the instruction above, your bookcase back should look a little something like this.

Then prop the bookcase back into it’s spot, and notice that by gluing in just the corners, it allows for a gap where cords can fit down which hides them from the front of the bookcase.

How easy was that?! And while it’s only a subtle difference with the trace paper, it makes the bookcase feel much more elegant than it is. If you want to add some more drama with a fun color or pattern, check out your local arts store for fun gift wrap paper, or even contact paper/wallpaper. This DIY bookcase backing can be quite the statement!